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20131202
20131210
Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14 (some duplicates have been removed)
about the next election and not enough worried about the next generation. what jack kennedy understood as well. that's the american people. we go through these periods where our politics gets all balanced up. the truth is sometimes we're nostalgic about the past. >> i am. >> i know you are. if over and over again they see they are not addressing the core problems we have, eventually they will put in place folks who are serious about getting the work done. >> let's talk about the problem with the legislative branch. the nature of america is an aisle down the center. those aisles have always been there. rarely have we had one party in power a year or two. are we stalk with this as long as we have two parties running our government. they can't compromise. they used to compromise. in the old days they would compromise and blame others for the ones they didn't like. today they don't and blame the other party. strike a deal and blame boehner for the parts you don't like and he can blame you for the parts he doesn't like. >> well, a couple of things. first of all -- >> compromise. >> i think
. but non-white people need add internal passport. papers please. at the end of world war ii, the election in south africa in 1948 unexpectedly brought to power a nationalist government on a platform they called apartness. in their language, it was pronounced apartheid. they started codifying immediately all the various ways that they could separate the population by race and treat people according to the ways that they thought the various races should be treated. in 1949, the prohibition of mixed marriages act which banned people of different races from getting married to each other, whether or not you got married, the immorality act of 1950 made sexual relations between different races a criminal act. also in 1950 the population registration act which made everyone in the country register by race and receive a racial classification, black, white, indian or colored. those were the four categorieca. and there were a million sub categories beneath those. not beneath white of course, white was just white. but for everybody else it could be a little more complicated. also in 1950, the group a
, please. passbook laws were not new. but at the end of world war two, the election brought to power that had run on a platform that they kaule apartness. the word apartness was pronounced apartheid. so when the so-called national party came to power, they started codifying all the various ways that they could separate the population by race. in 1949, the prohibition of mixed marriages act which banned people of different races from getting married to each other. whether or not you got married, the immorality act made sexual relations between different races a criminal act. the population registration act received an official classification. black, white, indian or colored. and then there were a million sub categories beneath those. white was just white, but, for everybody else, it could be a little complicated. >>> in 1950, the group areas act which geographically partitioned with the country arong racial lines. that one formed the basis for the state relocating people. in 1953, the jeer before the u.s. supreme court declared that separate educational facilities are unequal, south a
flagged it up, they said they wouldn't allow groups like karl rove's group, regarding elections, now alec doesn't do that, get involved in campaigns, it is actively involved in what happens to people after they get elected. you know, what happens to a state assemblyman and what laws are passed. and that is when alec gets >> it is a bit of fun or maybe a bit of lobbying going on there. there is a huge gray area in america about lobbying. and i think it will become more and more important, obama flagged it up, they said they wouldn't allow groups like karl rove's group, regarding elections, now alec doesn't do that, get involved in campaigns, it is actively involved in what happens to people after they get elected. you know, what happens to a state assemblyman and what laws are passed. and that is when alec gets involved. there will be more debate about it, alec is a tax-exempt charity. what it does is cook up legislation. >> if i had the choice of choosing who could be elected in a particular election or writing the laws that that person would introduce as a legislator once they were there
of those problems, but when you elected phil bryant to be your governor, he stopped you from fixing those problems. you could have done it. you were doing it, and he stopped you. mississippi, you could have been kentucky, but you are staying mississippi. it is now december. happy december. that means the sign-up exchanges for health insurance have been under way for two months now, two months and one day. month two, turns out, went much, much better than month one did, went like four times better. that's the same pattern that we saw in massachusetts six years ago when we essentially piloted this same policy for the nation under romney care in massachusetts. after a terrible first few weeks on the federal healthcare.gov website, the obama administration now says the site is working for most people most of the time, which is what they were hoping for by december 1. if the health care website is, in fact, working that much more smoothly, that should smooth the way for more people to get enrolled across the country. in the first nine weeks, in general, states running their own exchanges, kent
, regarding elections, now alec doesn't do that, get involved in campaigns, it is actively involved in what happens to people after they get elected. you know, what happens to a state assemblyman and what laws are passed. and that is when alec gets involved. there will be more debate about it, alec is a tax-exempt charity. what it does is cook up legislation. >> if i had the choice of choosing who could be elected in a particular election or writing the laws that that person would introduce as a legislator once they were there, i know which one i would pick. thank you very much for your time, sir, fascinating. we'll be right back. [ thunder crashes ] [ female announcer ] some people like to pretend a flood could never happen to them. and that their homeowners insurance protects them. [ thunder crashes ] it doesn't. stop pretending. only flood insurance covers floods. ♪ visit floodsmart.gov/pretend to learn your risk. i have a big meeting when we land, but i am so stuffed up, i can't rest. [ male announcer ] nyquil cold and flu liquid gels don't unstuff your nose. they don't? alka seltzer
government or how we end apartheid or how we have democratic elections. >> reporter: the negotiations begin in secret. the government does not want it publicly known that they are speaking with the enemy. mandela by not consulting with the anc leadership nknows they can disavow them if the negotiations go poorly. it is a risk he must take. >> the reason he made that decision is because he realized somebody had to start doing something. >> reporter: in 1988 the 70-year-old mandela is moved to yet another prison outside cape town. >> he's sent to another prison which is like a country club compared to where he had been before. >> reporter: negotiations continue, and slowly other prisoners are released. including mandela's friend and mentor, walter susulu in october 1989. >> there was this sense that mandela would be getting out of jail, and people were generally excited. you could feel it in the air. >> reporter: to the majority of black south africans, mandela's release and all that it represents is what they have spent nearly 30 years hoping for, fighting for, dying for. as that buildup rea
the 2004 election when president bush was reelected. "the times" on that story for a year is why edward snowden took his rev liegss further this year to "the guardian" in britain. today, the editor of "the guardian" has only published about 1% of what edward snowden gave them. is that decision not to publish 99% an issue of bravery, intimidati intimidation? is that judgment? they are deciding, in effect, what we get to know about what our government does based on their judgment of what counts as news. and their judgment conceivably of what harm they could cause by releasing to the public what they as a news organization are privileged to know that the rest of us to do. it is a very, very uncomfortable thing. it is part of why the job of a free and responsible press is a hard thing, a hard job, hard to do well. you want the people that do it to be worthy of the responsibility they have. tomorrow morning in a law officer in dan bury, connecticut. phone calls will be made available to the phone calls made the morning of the sandy hook shootings. the victims said they did not want those tap
Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14 (some duplicates have been removed)